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How is Sinusitis Treated?

How is Sinusitis Treated?

Medical Therapy

Sinusitis is typically treated first with medication. Treatment with antibiotics or topical nasal steroid sprays is often successful in reducing swelling, fighting infection, and relieving obstructions of the sinus opening. Inhaling steam or using nasal saline sprays or drops may also help relieve sinus discomfort. However, at least 20 percent of patients do not respond adequately to medications.

Conventional Sinus Surgery

Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) is often the next step toward finding sinusitis relief. Specialized instruments are placed into the nose along with a small endoscope to help the surgeon see inside the nose and nasal cavities. The procedure works by removing bone and tissue to enlarge the sinus opening and may lead to post-operative pain and bleeding that requires uncomfortable nasal packing to control. Approximately 500,000 FESS procedures are performed each year in the U.S.

Endoscopic Surgery with the LUMA Balloon SinuplastyTM System

This alternative solution in endoscopic sinus surgery uses minimally invasive sinus balloon catheters to position a balloon into the blocked sinus passageway. The balloon is then inflated to gently restructure and open the sinus passageway, restoring normal sinus drainage and function often without tissue or bone removal. The Relieva StratusTM Microflow Spacer is the newest device in this family and the only to release medication directly into the sinuses.

 

Gain Access to the Sinus

To gain sinus access, a sinus guide catheter is introduced into the nasal cavity to target the sinus ostia under endoscopic visualization. A sinus guidewire is passed through the sinus guide catheter and gently advanced into the target sinus.

 

Inflate Balloon Across Ostium

The sinus balloon catheter is introduced over the sinus guidewire  and positioned across the blocked ostium. The position of the sinus balloon catheter is confirmed and the balloon is gradually inflated to open and remodel the narrowed or blocked ostium.

 

 Deflate and Remove Balloon

The sinus balloon catheter is then deflated and removed, leaving the ostium open allowing the return of normal sinus drainage and function. There is little to no disruption to mucosal lining.

 

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